The Hypnosis Practice Cognitive Hypnotherapist and NLP Practitioner  
 
 
 
Index - General Resources:

1. Hypnotism: It's all in the mind (Independent Newpaper)

2. Hypnotic Imagery and Pain (Royal College of Physicians-September 15th 2004)

3. The Nature of Hypnosis

Index - Recommended Books:

1. Wordweaving - The Science of Suggestion (Trevor Silvestor)

2. Wordweaving Volume II - The Question is the Answer (Trevor Silvestor)

3. Authentic Happiness- Martin Seligman

4. Monsters and Magical Sticks- Steven Heller

5. Trances People Live-Stephen Wolinsky

Index - Downloads:

1. Watch this space!!!

General Resources:

1. Hypnotism: It's all in the mind (Independent Newpaper)

Once regarded as a cheap stage trick, hypnotism is proven to be a powerful medical treatment - and now it's available on the NHS. Roger Dobson reports
Tuesday, 30 January 2007

There's no magic, no swinging pendulums or swaying watches, and no one is counting backwards as they slump into unconsciousness. This is medical rather than stage or movie hypnotism, and it is increasingly being used to treat the symptoms of diseases and conditions as diverse as asthma, cystic fibrosis, snoring, migraines and warts.

It's been used to allow surgery and dental work without anaesthesia, and for pain-free childbirth without medication. And new evidence from the UK's first and only NHS centre offering hypnotherapy shows that it's highly effective in treating some types of chest pain as well as irritable bowel syndrome.

New research from America has also found that more than half the people who used hypnotherapy to give up smoking were able to kick the habit, while researchers in France have successfully used the therapy to lower blood pressure.

Hypnosis has been used for centuries to treat diverse ills, but it went into relative decline with the rise of modern medicine, and in the last 200 years it's been more associated with stage magicians and movie villains than medicine. Film-makers take a lot of blame for damaging the image of hypnotism: "When a hypnotist appears on screen, expect evil. If his induction features magnetic hand passes, he's probably about to compel someone to commit a crime. If he hypnotises with an intense stare, his intent is likelier seduction," says Dr Deirdre Barrett of Harvard Medical School, who has studied more than 200 films about hypnotism.

At the University Hospital of South Manchester, Professor Peter Whorwell, a gastroenterologist who heads the only NHS-funded hypnotherapy centre in Britain, which has been pioneering the therapy as a treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, agrees. "One of the problems is the name," he says. "If we started off again with a name like neuromodulation, for example, it would be more readily accepted. The name hypnotism has so much baggage attached. Cognitive behavioural therapy is now reasonably well accepted, and so, too, is psychotherapy, but of the three, I would say hypnotism is potentially the most powerful. It is becoming a treatment of choice for IBS.
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"When I am dead and gone, people are going to suddenly realise that hypnotism is an incredibly powerful tool and question why it has been ignored for so long."

Just how it works is not clear, and some critics suggest it's simply a way of relaxing. But practitioners say there's more to it, and that under hypnosis the patient can concentrate intensely on a specific thought, memory, feeling or sensation while blocking out distractions.

For further reading, click on link below.

2. Hypnotic Imagery and Pain (Royal College of Physicians-September 15th 2004)

Hypnotic imagery is widely used in pain management – particularly for longer-term pain conditions. One approach that I shall return to later is to ask the client in hypnosis to create an image of a ‘dial’ (or something similar) to represent their current experience of pain. It is then possible to suggest that they use the dial to ‘turn the pain down’ (or sometimes to turn it up and then down to emphasise self-efficacy). Another effective strategy involves transformation of a self-generated image. One of my own clients, for example, described her chronic neck/shoulder pain as being like the lava in a volcano, welling up, causing pressure etc.. She was able to use hypnotic imagery to move the pain up to the top of her head and allow it to be released – like a volcanic eruption. She was able to reduce her pain from 7 or 8 (on a 10 point scale) to 1 or 2 using this imagery and subsequently to employ it pre-emptively to prevent pain reaching unacceptable levels. When she had used the technique for some time, and had achieved a sense of control over her pain, her image had changed and she described the release of ‘lava’ as more like a trickle than the violent outpouring it has been at first.

One particular type of chronic pain that is often difficult to treat by traditional means is phantom limb pain. A little while ago we reviewed 12 single case studies where hypnotic imagery had been used to alleviate this type of pain (Oakley, Gracey-Whitman & Halligan, 2002). We found that the treatment strategies used in these cases were essentially of two types that we labelled as ‘ipsative/imagery-based’ and ‘movement/imagery-based’.

Ipsative imagery is that used by the client in describing their own pain and the intervention consists of transforming that image into something more tolerable or manageable. The ‘volcano’ imagery described above is one example of ipsative imagery transformation. Another example, from our review paper, is that of a client who experienced one component of her phantom limb pain as being ‘ like tight rubber bands’ around her phantom knee and thigh (Chaves, 1993). She dealt with this in hypnotic imagery by cutting the rubber bands one by one with scissors and as they were released she envisaged them flying across the room. A more recent example comes from one of my own clients who had experienced disabling phantom limb pain ever since her below knee amputation two years previously. She described two major components to the pain in her phantom right leg. The more intense was an intermittent ‘bursting, fizzling’ pain ‘like a firework about to explode’ that started low down in her foot and progressed upwards like a ‘carpet-knife scraping at the flesh’ over her shin bone. The other source of discomfort was a more general background ‘tingling’ in her phantom limb that made her feel anxious and depressed, disturbed her....

To read more of the above-mentioned article, click on link below.

3. The Nature of Hypnosis

The British Psychological Society

St Andrews House 48 Princess Road East, Leicester LE1 7DR March 2001

This paper has been prepared by a working party convened at the request of the Professional Affairs Board of the British Psychological Society. The scope of this document is to provide a considered statement about hypnosis and important issues concerning its application and practice in a range of contexts, notably for clinical purposes, forensic investigation,academic research, entertainment and training.
Recommended Books:

1. Wordweaving - The Science of Suggestion (Trevor Silvestor)

A Comprehensive Guide to Creating Hypnotic Language by Trevor Silvester

Wordweaving presents a radical new approach to the use of hypnotic suggestion. For years Hypnotherapists have used scripts which are aimed at a particular problem, like smoking or weight loss, rather than aiming at the client who smokes or has weight issues.

This book suggests that it is not the problem that is the problem; it's the client's unique relationship with the problem that's the problem. Mastering this book will free you from the constraints of scripts and enable you to use your creative skill to weave subtle spells that empower your clients by changing their model of reality.

It presents the science behind suggestion, and the means of using that science to create magical ways of influencing others.

2. Wordweaving Volume II - The Question is the Answer (Trevor Silvestor)

I commend this book to you, understanding its concepts can only help to make you a better therapist. - Gil Boyne

Modern Hypnotherapy involves far more than reading problem-related scripts to clients, it involves understanding the client and using their way of seeing the world to help them with their issue. In The Question is the Answer Trevor Silvester shows you how to ask the questions that provide you with the information you need to create hypnotic language patterns specifically for each client, and guide them to finding their own answers to life’s problems.

Building on the model introduced in Wordweaving: The Science of Suggestion, you will be able to integrate your suggestions into a model of therapy that guides you from the first appointment to the last, maintaining your focus on the client’s outcome, and adapting to the changing situation as it evolves.

Using a questioning model developed by his observation of the great Gil Boyne the author shows you how three simple questions can uncover the pattern of a client’s issue, and also create their evidence for recovery.

How we imagine our future is a key to how we create it. This book also shows you how to guide the client to their most fulfilling future – and provides a script based on scientific research that has been proven to increase how lucky we feel.

The Question is the Answer is aimed at therapists and counsellors who want to improve their ability to ethically influence, develop amazing hypnotic language skills, and have a therapeutic framework that provides the maximum opportunity for creativity, without sacrificing clarity of purpose.

3. Authentic Happiness- Martin Seligman

Martin Seligman's most stimulating, persuasive book to date -- the acclaimed author of "Learned Optimism" introduces yet another revolutionary idea. Drawing on groundbreaking scientific research, Seligman shows how Positive Psychology is shifting the profession's paradigm away from its narrow-minded focus on pathology, victimology, and mental illness to positive emotion and mental health. Happiness, studies show, is not the result of good genes or luck. It can be cultivated by identifying and nurturing traits that we already possess -- including kindness, originality, humor, optimism, and generosity. Seligman provides the tools you need in order to ascertain your most positive traits or strengths. Then he explains how, by frequently calling upon these "signature strengths" in all the crucial realms of life -- health, relationships, career -- you will not only develop natural buffers against misfortune and negative emotion, but also achieve new and sustainable levels of authentic contentment, gratification, and meaning.

4. Monsters and Magical Sticks- Steven Heller

If you want to know how hypnosis really works (and, no, it has nothing to do with waving of hands or other similar nonsense), you will want to read this book. If you want to know the "magic" behind Ericksonian techniques and Neuro-Linguistic Programming, you have to read this book. From one of the true masters of hypnotherapy, this is one book that can really change your life!!

5. Trances People Live-Stephen Wolinsky

At last, the missing piece of the dysfunctional puzzle. It is not enough to understand or even relive our childhood traumas. Dr. Wolinsky shows us how we continue to recreate those traumas in our adult lives and how to stop creating them. Every uncomfortable emotional state, and many psychosomatic symptoms, are also states of trance. Trance is the "glue" that holds the problem in the present moment. Learning to identify the kind of trance state beneath a problem or symptom gives us the tool that finally dissolves the glue. This book offers a gold-mine of resources for those who suffer from dysfunctional patterns of behavior or for anyone who feels stuck in an undesirable emotional or addictive state. Learning to step out of the trance states that create our problems and symptoms is to learn to step into the present moment at last free of the baggage from our past.
Downloads:

1. Watch this space!!!

 
Cognitive Hypnotherapist:
Please feel free to visit any of the recommended practitioners listed below:
The Clerkenwell Group:
Clerkenwell
www.theclerkenwellgroup.com
Sue Carl:
Camberley, Surrey
www.thecroftonpractice.co.uk
Quest Institude, National Council for Hypnotherapy

Practice Times:
Appointment times are available to begin at the following times:
(at various London sites)

Monday - Friday: 9.30am, 11.00am, 12.30pm, 5.30pm & 7.00pm

Saturday: 10.00am & 11.30am

 
 
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